Business Law

How an Oklahoma Limited Liability Company is taxed

One of the factors to consider when choosing whether to do business as an Oklahoma corporation or Oklahoma limited liability company is how the new entity will be taxed.  There are several options for both corporations and limited liability companies.  Below is a diagram explaining how an Oklahoma limited liability company is taxed.

 

The source for this information is the Internal Revenue Service website, specifically this page.

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Oklahoma limited liability company

The Oklahoma series LLC is not only for real estate but also for . . .

Bernard Spragg. NZ

You probably know that an Oklahoma series limited liability company provides excellent protection for owning multiple tracts of real properties (think rental homes).

But did you know that the Oklahoma series limited liability company may very well work with other non-real property assets and forms of doing business such as:

◊High value medical & business equipment.

For example, a doctor or dentist who owns medical imaging equipment valued six figures, where such equipment can (in remote scenarios) generate substantial liability. Think diagnostic imaging where the machine doesn’t deliver a reliable image . . .

◊Separate divisions of a company

A business owner might use an Oklahoma series LLC to segment a large business in separate departments or divisions. In this context, the terms “department” or “division” don’t have a particular legal meaning but rather describe business segments.

◊Separate product lines offered by a company

You can create a department (or a division – they mean similar things and are sometimes used interchangeably) without filing or drafting any legal agreement at all. However, some companies appreciate the formal separation that accompanies separate series. You can do the same thing for product lines, employee teams, projects, business locations and for other business components.”

◊Equity Compensation Program within a business

As a spinoff of the separate product lines topic about, this use might work in a business with multiple divisions. With each division segregated into a separate series, the LLC can give the key employees of each series some sort of equity interest tied to that series only rather than equity interests in the entity as a whole. This rewards employees in productive divisions and protects them from the potential downside of other divisions.


The Oklahoma law series LLC law allows real property and other assets to be owned by a series. This means that the possible series LLC uses listed above are but a few items. I touched on this topic briefly in this post on the practical uses of an Oklahoma series limited liability company.

By the way, in listing these items I am not endorsing them as the correct use for you or your property. Before you implement a series LLC, take the time to talk with an attorney to discuss the plusses and minuses based on your specific set of circumstances.

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Oklahoma limited liability company

What is an independent contractor under Oklahoma law?

Unfortunately, there is no easy answer to this question.  It is based on a range of factors and determined by different sources depending on what you are doing and who is raising the question.  For example, the Internal Revenue Service has a list of factors it considers which you can find here.  If you are in Oklahoma, it is important to know what Oklahoma authorities say matters.

According to the Oklahoma Worker’s Compensation Commission, these are the relevant factors to consider in determining whether a worker is an independent contractor:

  • The nature of the contract shows that the worker is independent from the contractor. For example, the contract may contain an agreement that the contracting party is an independent contractor.
  • The degree of control exercised by the principal (employer) over the work. The greater the degree of control exercised by the principal, the greater the likelihood is that the worker is an employee, rather than an independent contractor.
  • Whether the worker is engaged in a distinct occupation or business for others. For example, the worker is a painter who paints houses for multiple employers.
  • The kind of occupation with reference to whether, in the locality, the work is usually done under the direction of the employer or by a specialist without supervision;
  • Whether the occupation requires special skills, license, education, or training; which tends to indicate that the worker is a contractor.
  • The worker supplies all or most of the materials that he or she needs to perform the job. If this is the case, it tends to indicate that the worker is an independent contractor.
  • The length of the job, i.e., whether the job is a one-time job or a job that will be performed on a regular basis.
  • The worker is paid as a separate contractor, e.g., an invoice is provided to the worker for his/her services; the worker is paid by the job; the worker files a federal income tax return for his/her business; the worker is provided with an IRS Form 1099 from the principal.
  • Whether or not the work is a part of the regular business of the employer;
  • Whether or not the parties believe they are creating the relationship of master and servant;
  • The right of either party to terminate the relationship without liability.
Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law, Oklahoma Employment Law

Checklist of items to consider when buying or selling real estate

From http://momoge.com

If you are buying real estate, my top recommendation is to use a licensed realtor. The kind of person who legally has the right put the big “R” by their name. I know several good ones, including Dave Moeller of Redbud Realty & Associates in Edmond. The standard principal applies: hire a professional to do the work that is outside of your area of expertise. Buying a home is one of the most important decisions we make and having solid representation in the process is critical.

If for some reason you find yourself purchasing or selling land without a Realtor, consider these basic points as a starting place to negotiating the deal:

 

  • What is the purchase price?

  • How will the purchase price be paid? (all at closing, part earnest money and the rest at closing)

  • What are the conditions on which earnest money can/is required to be refunded?

  • Who will pay for the title work on the property?

  • Who will pay the transfer fees connected to the recording of the deed?

  • Where will closing happen? (typically a title company in the county where the property is located, but you can close a real estate deal without being physically present at signing, you can sign the documents in advance)?

  • Are you transferring mineral rights to the property or keeping the rights?

 

If you want to get more tips and checklists like this, please sign up for the email list.

Sales Tag


Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law

Oklahoma Business Law: When is an employer required to pay for overtime?

If you are a business owner or someone in a position of authority with a business, do you know if your business required to pay overtime to employees?

You might be surprised by the answer, read on to find out.

For Oklahoma employers covered by the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (“FLSA”), the FLSA controls the payment of overtime.  Here are the basic requirements your business must meet to required to pay overtime pay:
  • The business must be covered by the FLSA.  Consider this blog post to answer the question of whether your business covered by the FLSA.
  • The employee must not be an exempt employee to qualify for overtime pay.  Consider this post for the type of employees who might be exempt from the FLSA.
  • The employee must work more than 40 hours in one work week. 

 

What is the work week? I have seen some uncertainty about this from employers.  According to the United States Department of Labor:

The Act applies on a workweek basis. An employee’s workweek is a fixed and regularly recurring period of 168 hours — seven consecutive 24-hour periods. It need not coincide with the calendar week, but may begin on any day and at any hour of the day. Different workweeks may be established for different employees or groups of employees. Averaging of hours over two or more weeks is not permitted. Normally, overtime pay earned in a particular workweek must be paid on the regular pay day for the pay period in which the wages were earned.

 

To summarize:  All nonexempt employees of an FLSA-covered employer must be paid at a time and a half for all hours worked over 40 in the same work week.


Discouraging fact provided by the Tulsa World:

Oklahoma Minimum Wage

Oklahoma Minimum Wage

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law, Oklahoma Employment Law

If I start an additional business do I need a new company?

Cox+logo
Have you ever wondered why some companies that have multiple lines of business have multiple legal entities to operate them?
Why does one company have a holding company that owns 14 different Oklahoma limited limited liability companies?
The answer may be important to your Oklahoma company as you expand and grow.

The General Philosophy

My general philosophy on adding new business is if it is a business that is distinct from the existing business and/or presents new types of liability, the new line of business should be operated under a new legal entity.

Primary Purpose

The primary purpose of this legal separation is to attempt to keep the legal liabilities created by each business separate from the other business. For example, if a separate line of business such as roofing is sued due to an employee accident, if the new business is legally separate from the existing business, it much harder for the plaintiff in the lawsuit to involve the existing business in any way.

 

This is an advancement of the concept of using a legal entity (Oklahoma corporation or Oklahoma LLC) to separate your business from your yourself. A sole proprietor typically incorporates so that the business is operated legally separate from themselves. That is, the legal entity creates a wall of separation between the business activity and the owner’s individual assets. A claim against the business should not normally lead to the liability of the owner.

Key consideration

One thing to consider is whether you new business is simply a additional “line of business” or whether it is a new business with its primary tie to the existing business being common ownership.

A new line of business or new business unit may not require a new legal entity. While a new business very often requires the creation of a new legal entity.

Example from your friend in the the digital age

Cox Enterprises is an example of this type of legal separation for distinct business. Cox Entrprises is diversified media conglamorate that owns newspapers, dealertrack technologies, television stations, radio stations, Cox Communications, Manheim Auctions, Autotrader, Kelley Blue Book,Savings.com and Valpak. Many of the seperate lines of business are owned by separate entities including Cox Media Group, Inc., Cox Advanced Services Oklahoma, L.L.C. and Cox Cable Authorized Retailer, Inc.

A practical example

A business owner could create a new entity for the new business and still use the existing business for branding purposes. You could do this through a basic licensing agreement between your existing entity and the new entity and a shared services agreement. Additionally, you set up a holding company as the entity on top and then operate each business under entities owned by the holding company. You would create two new entities to carry out this plan and then set up one as Entity 1, in which you would own 100%, and then Entity 2 and Entity 3, which would each be owned 100% by Entity 1.

Questions to ask yourself

A couple of questions to ask yourself to determine whether you need a new legal entity:
  • How will new business be connected to the existing business?
  • Will new business use the same name as the existing business?
  • What other ties will the new business have to the existing business?
Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law, Oklahoma limited liability company

Tips on law office management for solo and small firm attorneys

While it is somewhat difficult for me to believe, back in 2007 I was actually giving people advice on managing your law office if you were a solo or small firm attorney! I know that this happened because I came across the PowerPoint presentation that is below when I was looking for some other files this morning.

If you are interested in the ideas for management organization in a small office there could be some good material in here.

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law

The Oklahoma Series LLC Part 2 – practical uses

In part 1 of the Series LLC I discussed what the series LLC is and how it works. This post provides information on the tax implications and practical uses for the series LLC.

III. Tax Implications

As you know, federal tax law rather than state law determines the existence of an entity for tax purposes. In many cases, the members of each series of an LLC will be identical. In such cases, it is fairly certain that the series LLC as a whole will be treated as a single tax entity for federal tax purposes. On the other hand, if the series of an LLC has the same members, or identical or similar membership rights, or similar business purposes, each series may be treated as a separate LLC for income tax purposes.

In both cases, however, there should be only one filing with a state’s secretary of state for the LLC (rather than for the individual series). Furthermore, in most cases, there should be only one state franchise (or similar) tax filing.

IV. Practical Uses of the Series LLC

The most obvious use for the series LLC is to hold multiple parcels of real property in liability-segregated cells. Owners of small commercial or residential properties may find the series LLC particularly appealing.  This is especially true in states with high minimum franchise taxes. Forming and maintaining a number of separate LLCs may cost several thousand dollars in the year of formation and several thousand dollars each subsequent year.  The use of a series LLC with each property held by a separate series may save several thousand dollars in startup costs and another several thousand dollars a year in ongoing administrative and state tax costs.

Another use for the series LLC is to facilitate an equity compensation program in a business with multiple divisions. With each division segregated into a separate series, the LLC can give the key employees of each series some sort of equity interest tied to that series only rather than equity interests in the entity as a whole. This rewards employees at productive divisions and protects them from the potential downside of other divisions.

Finally, a series LLC could be used to facilitate the combination of business operations of distinct businesses.  For example, rather than undertaking a traditional merger, two companies wishing to join forces might form a series LLC, with each company contributing its assets to a separate series, or with the owners of each company contributing their ownership interests to a separate series. The LLC agreement and series agreements could be drafted to determine exactly which rights and responsibilities are shared and which are maintained separately. The series LLC provides a unique and very flexible framework for this sort of business combination.


Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law, Oklahoma limited liability company

The Oklahoma Series LLC – Part 1: one LLC with the protection of 50 LLCs

 

 

The Oklahoma series LLC is a relatively new way for the more efficient and effective management of assets.  You can create one limited liability company and get the benefit of having multiple limited liability companies.  Below is a post 1 of 2 explaining the Oklahoma serial LLC and how you might be able to use it.

I. The Legal Reason

Segregating “dangerous” assets and businesses into separate entities away from other assets, especially “safe” assets, is always a good idea from an asset protection point of view. For example, an individual who owns a gas station and a rental home should not own both within the same entity.

In the best case scenario, every distinct business or major business asset should be segregated into a different limited liability entity.  Ideally, someone with 25 rental properties would have 25 separate LLCs, one for each property. However, this is not always practical because of administrative costs and government fees that must be paid for each LLC. What can a business owner in this situation do to protect their assets from liabilities unrelated to those assets in a cost-effective way?

II. The Oklahoma Series LLC

A. The Act
The series LLC may provide an answer. The Oklahoma LLC Act (the “Act”) provides for the creation of separate protected “cells” (‘series’) within one limited liability “container” (the series LLC) without the need to create separate entities, thus avoiding the inefficiencies associated with multiple related entities.

The Act provides that the liabilities of a particular series are enforceable only against the assets of that series. The Act also provides that classes or groups of members can be established, having whatever rights the LLC agreement says they have.  The combination of these two provisions allows a series to function in many ways as a separate entity for practical purposes. The series LLC concept is similar in function to segregated portfolio companies and protected cell companies designed for the mutual fund and captive insurance industries in a number of offshore and onshore jurisdictions.

The Act allows an LLC agreement to designate series of members, managers or LLC interests that have separate rights and duties with respect to specific LLC property or obligations. So, each series can be tied to specific assets and can also have different members and managers.

Most importantly, the Act provides that debts, liabilities and obligations incurred, contracted for or otherwise existing with respect to a particular series are enforceable against that series only, and not against the assets of the LLC generally or any other series of the LLC.

B. Obtaining Protection
In order to obtain inter-series liability protection, each series must be treated separately and the public must be put on notice of the liability limitation by the inclusion of the series limitations in the LLC’s Articles of Organization filed with the Oklahoma Secretary of State. Records must be kept for each series and the assets of each series must be held and accounted for separately. The separate holding and accounting required may be in the LLC’s records, so long as separate and distinct records are maintained for each series.

 

Check out Part 2 of this series on “series” right here.

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law, Oklahoma limited liability company

The issues to consider from the employer’s side in a severance agreement

04-02426 Long-time Ryan employee Earl Prudden

Have you ever had to terminate an employee?

Did you know that offering some severance pay and getting a severance agreement can protect your business?

Employees are terminated. When it happens, both the employer and the employee need to know what issues to be thinking about.  One thing to consider is a severance agreement.

A severance agreement typically means that a terminated employee is going to receive money that they were not already entitled to receive in exchange for waiving claims they have against the employer.

This mind map covers some of the issues an employer should be thinking about when drafting and signing a severance agreement with an employee.

 

[gview file=”http://shawnjroberts.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Preview-of-“Drafting-a-Severance-and-Release-Agreement-employer-side”.pdf”]

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law