Oklahoma employment law

What is Federal Employment Law?

Federal employment law is the body of laws passed by Congress and signed into law by the President that cover a variety of employment issues throughout the United States, for employers who are covered under the size qualifications of the various laws. Some of the federal employment laws are:

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII), which prohibits employment discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin;

Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 (ADEA), which protects individuals who are 40 years of age or older;

Equal Pay Act of 1963 (EPA), which protects men and women who perform substantially equal work in the same establishment from sex-based wage discrimination;
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Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law, Oklahoma Employment Law

Oklahoma Employment Law: Is my employer allowed to require me to work past my scheduled hours?

Q: Is my employer allowed to require me to work past my scheduled hours?
A: Employers have the right to schedule the minimum and maximum number of hours that employees may or may not work. Employers can change employees’ hours without notice and may require employees to work overtime.

Source: Oklahoma Employment Law Oklahoma Department of Labor

Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Business Law

You will have a job . . . it may be as my mistress, but you will have a job

How do you lose a sexual harassment case if you are an Oklahoma employer?

Consider the pathway paved by the supervisor in this post:

A supervisor actually wrote the line in the title in an email to a woman he was supervising, as the woman was preparing to take medical leave to have surgery.  I came across this email while working on employment discrimination case.  Imagine that, an employer with a supervisor like this one getting sued for employment discrimination!?!  It happened, I defended the employer.   Here is the full email exchange:

Female Employee: Just reminding you I will be gone from tomorrow through the 14th, on medical leave.  I know I will be missed J  Hope I have a job when I come back!

Supervisor: You will have a job when you come back . . . it may be as my mistress, but you will have a job.

This exchange teaches two lessons:

  1. Don’t write anything you would be embarrassed for your wife, husband, mother to read.
  2. If you must write it, remember it could be read in court some day or even worse be published to the world through the Web.
Posted by Shawn Roberts in Blogposts, Oklahoma Employment Law